Double trouble – Blueberry pot with a ginger biscuit

Anyone who knows me can tell you I am no baker.  This was confirmed 3 years ago when I made a banana loaf that my niece spat out onto the couch after taking the tiniest bite.  She was so offended by it she brushed it off her tongue AND pushed it off the couch.  Since then I have been on a mission to improve my baking skills and make an edible banana loaf – practice makes perfect!

Today I  challenged myself (crazy, I know) and baked some ginger biscuits to go with some blueberry pots.  The blueberry pots are real easy to make but like many desserts contain a lot of naughty ingredients.  So, it being the weekend and all, I thought I may as well go all out and make some ginger biscuits to go with the blueberry pots.  Why not?

Here are the recipes:

Ginger biscuit prep

The prep. part

Ginger biscuits, makes 20. (adaption on a recipe from Fiona Cairns, Bake Decorate, Tea Time Luxury)

  • 175g sifted plain flour
  • Mứt gừng đeo (Vietnamese  dried sweetened ginger) in place of ground ginger, blitzed in the food processor
  • 1 tablespoon of black treacle
  • 1 tablespoon of agave
  • ¼ teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda
  • ½ teaspoon of cinnamon
  • 40g fruit sugar
  • 65g salted butter
  • Zest of 1/2 an orange, finely grated (or finely chopped since I had already removed the skin with a zester!)
  • Salted butter, slightly soft and cut into chunks
  • 1 egg yolk

Blueberry pots, makes 12 espresso/Turkish tea cups

  • 70g fruit sugar (using fruit sugar reduces the number of sins being committed in eating this dessert, kinda.)
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 600ml double cream
  • 125g blueberries, washed.

The cooking/assembling part

Ginger biscuits

You know when you are on holiday and you come across something you just need to get, and you come home realising you don’t know what to do with it?  Yep?  Well, that’s where the mứt gừng đeo (Vietnamese dried sweetened ginger) comes into play.   I’ve only used it once since I bought it in November and still have A LOT left to use.  Thought (and hoped) this would work nicely in the ginger biscuits and make them a little bit chewy and add a little bit of a crunch to them too since they come with peanuts.

  • Sifted flour and bicarbonate of soda into a bowl, and added butter and  the mứt gừng đeo.
  • Rubbed together until it formed a breadcrumb like consistency.
  • Added the remaining ingredients and mixed in to form a dough.  Wrapped in cling and placed in the fridge for 1 hour.
  • Once chilled for 1 hour, put oven to preheat at 180ºC and rolled out dough on a lightly floured surface.  Lined baking tray with greaseproof paper.
  • Cut the biscuits using the rim of a Turkish tea cup (told you, I’m no baker so I’m improvising with what I have.  Though I do have a rolling pin!).
  • Chucked in the oven for 15 minutes.

Blueberry pots

  • Poured cream and fruit sugar into a pan and put onto a low heat to allow the sugar to dissolve.
  • Removed from the heat.  Allowed to cool a little and stirred in the blueberries and lemon juice into the mixture.
  • Poured mixture into espresso cups and chucked into the fridge to chill.  Ready after 2 hours.

Good one to make the night before if you have friends over for dinner.  It also works real well with lemon or passion fruit in place of the blueberries.

Blueberry pots with ginger biscuits

Hope you, your friends and your family enjoy it.  My niece will be the judge on whether my baking skills have improved.  Wish me luck!!

xx

 

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3 thoughts on “Double trouble – Blueberry pot with a ginger biscuit

  1. Kim

    Mmmmm Nims, the pots were delicious, I believe your niece was very impressed with your baking because the ginger biscuits were all gone! But the pots were creamy and sweet and you can’t go wrong with blueberries. Enjoying your write-ups Nims! What you cooking next?! Can I make a request? I remember your home-made sausage rolls are to die for! Xx

    Like

  2. Pingback: Practice Does Make Perfect – Banana and Cashew Loaf with Butter Icing and Caramelised Cashews | Nim's Din.

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